Do Huskies Make Good Service Dogs?

Huskies are without a doubt a popular breed of dog. Many people have purchased a Huskie to have as a household pet. It is not uncommon to see one of these large, fluffy dogs out walking, or at the dog park.

But could this relationship between humans and huskies be extended to make them into good service dogs or good therapy dogs?

A service dog is a dog that helps its human companion carry out day-to-day tasks safely. A therapy dog helps humans who have certain physical, emotional, or psychological needs.

Some Examples Of Service Dogs and Therapy Dogs

One example of a service dog would be a Labrador who assists a blind person with navigating their world safely, such as crossing a busy road.

Other examples of service dogs are Beagles, which are used as sniffer dogs to find hidden drugs in luggage at airports, or German Shepherds, which are used in prisons as guard dogs to subdue and apprehend violent or escaped criminals.

One example of a therapy dog is a Labradoodle that is trained to help autistic children regulate their emotions by providing a calming presence.

The Purpose Of The Husky

Huskies were originally bred as sled dogs to move cargo in snowy environments, such as the Arctic. This is why Huskies have such a thick and fluffy coat so that they do not feel the cold. 

Given the purpose for which this dog was bred, it has made them a hard-working breed that absolutely needs hard physical work and a purpose. Huskies are working dogs.

husky therapy dog

Can A Husky Be A Service Dog Or A Therapy Dog?

The purpose for which huskies were bred means that they are not well-suited to being kept as household pets if they are to be left to their own devices in the average suburban backyard. They can become destructive to property, and boredom can lead to escape attempts that can have dire consequences; these dogs are consummate escape artists.

These dogs also have a strong prey drive, which means that they are hard-wired to chase smaller animals.

Therefore, based on this understanding of the psychology of this breed, they DO NOT have what it takes to be good and reliable service dogs when it comes to assisting the disabled, such as a blind person. Similarly, they may be too strong and boisterous to make good therapy dogs.

A husky needs a dominant owner, who becomes its pack leader and shows it who’s boss. If they do not have this type of leadership, they will try and assume this role themselves, and try to dominate their owner. 

If a Huskie does not respect their leader, they will respond with disobedience. Obviously, any dog that is to serve humans needs to have high obedience and compliance. 

Huskies would not be suited to being a sniffer dog at an airport. This is because they are highly distractible, and airports are very busy places. 

However, one domain where the Huskie may be of service to people is protection. The reason for this is because they need one person to lead them, like their human partner, i.e. a prison officer, would. 

Additionally, huskies are large, fast, and strong dogs that have the physical properties required to subdue and apprehend criminals. 

Dogs that work in prisons are usually kept caged together, which would suit this breed’s pack mentality; they have been bred to be a part of a team.

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Do Huskies Make Good Service Dogs?

To summarise:

  1. Huskies are popular household pets but are not really suited to this due to the purpose for which they were bred, which is hard, physical labor with a purpose.
  2. Huskies are too headstrong, dominant, and distractible to be of proper use as seeing-eye dogs, sniffer dogs, or therapy dogs;
  3. The Huskie may have some value as a protection dog, due to its love of firm leadership, and its physical confidence.

Read more about Can A Husky Be An Emotional Support Dog?

If You Are Looking For a Therapy Dog, Check Out This Video With The Best Therapy Dog Breeds

If readers have any questions about this topic, please comment.

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